The Gamer Motivation Model in Handy Reference Chart and Slides

By | 2016-10-17T20:02:33+00:00 December 15th, 2015|Analytics, Video Games|27 Comments

A total of over 140,000 gamers worldwide have now completed the Gamer Motivation Profile. Statistical analysis of how motivations cluster together is consistent with what we reported earlier.

Want to know how you compare with other gamers on these motivations? Take a 5-minute survey and get your Gamer Motivation Profile.

To make the Gamer Motivation Model easier to understand and share, we’ve put together some reference charts and slides. First, we have a chart that lists all the motivations and how they are related. Motivations in the same column are more highly correlated than motivations in different columns. The chart also provides brief descriptions of each motivation.

Second, we have a short set of PDF slides that provides the chart and more detailed descriptions of each motivation along with game examples. Click the image below to download the PDF.

Click to download the PDF

We have some really exciting findings we’ll be sharing in the coming weeks (e.g., a higher-level visual map of all these motivations), but we wanted to make sure we laid the groundwork for the describing the model before diving too deep in the data.

By | 2016-10-17T20:02:33+00:00 December 15th, 2015|Analytics, Video Games|27 Comments

About the Author:

Nick is the co-founder and analytics lead of Quantic Foundry. He combines social science and data science to understand gamer behavior in large-scale game data.

27 Comments

  1. The Gamer Motivation Model | Teaching + Learnin... December 16, 2015 at 10:07 am - Reply

    […] "A total of over 140,000 gamers worldwide have now completed the Gamer Motivation Profile. Statistical analysis of how motivations cluster together is consistent with what we reported earlier. To make the Gamer Motivation Model easier to understand and share, we’ve put together some reference charts and slides. First, we have a chart that lists all the motivations and how they are related. Motivations in the same column are more highly correlated than motivations in different columns. The chart also provides brief descriptions of each motivation." | by Nick Yee  […]

  2. What motivates us to play games? – Games Precipice December 16, 2015 at 4:43 pm - Reply

    […] Data Analytics – Quantic Foundry – Gamer Motivation Model […]

  3. Alex Harkey December 16, 2015 at 5:14 pm - Reply

    This is a very impressive segmentation of gamer motivations. I’m excitedly looking forward to what is to come.

  4. Xen December 16, 2015 at 9:43 pm - Reply

    This is super interesting and I was able to more or less identify myself and some of my friends using this framework. The rough categories do seem to correlate well with what I perceive to be their game preferences.

  5. Nate S. December 17, 2015 at 7:40 am - Reply

    Fantastic Work! I am going to be digesting a lot of information from your site.

  6. John Hornberger December 17, 2015 at 8:45 am - Reply

    Disappointed to find out this was about video games. I find tabletop gaming vastly more worthwhile and enjoyable, and at first glance I thought the categories you laid out were based on board game categories. Perhaps you, or someone else, could expand this model to include all of gaming, not just the video subculture?

  7. Gaming Motivations Group Into 3 High-Level Clusters - Quantic Foundry December 21, 2015 at 12:48 am - Reply

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    […] "A total of over 140,000 gamers worldwide have now completed the Gamer Motivation Profile. Statistical analysis of how motivations cluster together is consistent with what we reported earlier. To make the Gamer Motivation Model easier to understand and share, we’ve put together some reference charts and slides. First, we have a chart that lists all the motivations and how they are related. Motivations in the same column are more highly correlated than motivations in different columns. The chart also provides brief descriptions of each motivation." | by Nick Yee  […]

  9. Game Genre Map: The Cognitive Threshold in Strategy Games - Quantic Foundry January 20, 2016 at 10:03 am - Reply

    […] let’s plot all these games using just their Strategy and Excitement scores. In our Gamer Motivation Model, Strategy is the appeal of thinking, planning ahead, and making decisions; Excitement is the appeal […]

  10. Player Profiling – with reading list | Game Analytics Resources v. Anders Drachen February 4, 2016 at 5:46 am - Reply

    […] Yee, N. Ducheneaut, N. (2015). The Gamer Motivation Model in Handy Reference Chart and Slides. Online. URL: http://quanticfoundry.com/2015/12/15/handy-reference/ […]

  11. As Gamers Age, The Appeal of Competition Drops The Most. Strategy is The Most Age-Stable Motivation. - Quantic Foundry February 10, 2016 at 10:34 am - Reply

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    […] Foundry’s Gamer Motivation Model splits our motivations into twelve categories, including Social, Excitement, Competition, […]

  13. Revisiting the Strategy Genre Map: Age, Audience Homogeneity, and the Lasso Effect March 23, 2016 at 10:34 am - Reply

    […] see how they compare with other gamers. Over 220,000 gamers worldwide have taken this survey. The 12 motivations that are measured in our model were identified via statistical analysis of how gaming motivations […]

  14. John K. Eller March 24, 2016 at 4:58 pm - Reply

    Have you seen the players segmentation from Piwag, based on 70 motivations? It sounds way more complete to me. What do you think about it?

    • Nick Yee March 24, 2016 at 5:26 pm - Reply

      Do you have a link to these 70 motivations? I’m seeing laundry lists of game feature tags in their video, but isn’t this already what Steam does (http://store.steampowered.com/tag/)? And fundamentally, it’s easy for gamers and game dev to brainstorm large laundry lists of game features. The hard part is figuring out whether there’s a more parsimonious structure underlying the list.

      • John K. Eller March 26, 2016 at 7:34 am

        I was about to searching for them, glad you remind me their video. You can see them here https://youtu.be/GrbHV99IhhM?t=4m43s in the “Psycographic Criteria” section.
        Game features tags (like Steam) is the tags section just above.

        I met them this week in France, they explained the psychographic criteria are the 70+ motivations. In their form I found every motivations of your model, but with more elements. I asked them if they ever heard about your model, they said no. Maybe you should contact them to have more informations, I’m not an expert of this stuff.

  15. Laurence April 4, 2016 at 9:27 am - Reply

    HI,
    Very interesting analysis !
    How much is it about mobile gamers ?

    • Nick Yee April 4, 2016 at 1:58 pm - Reply

      Hi Laurence – In our gamer sample (currently over 220,000 gamers), about 36% regularly play on smartphone/tablet. See this page (http://quanticfoundry.com/the-v22-sample/) for more details on the sample.

  16. Podcast 14: Why People Play Games | The Psychology of Video Games April 18, 2016 at 4:45 am - Reply

    […] More information about the Gamer Motivation Model and player types […]

  17. David Fuster April 27, 2016 at 8:41 am - Reply

    I find this motivational model very practical. It would be quite interesting to know from those 220,000 gamers, what percentage of them is inclined to each motivation. For example 10% of gamers are very inclined to competitive motivations, 45% are very inclined to immersive motivations,..Obviously, the sum of percentages would be higher than 100% as one gamer can be inclined to more than one motivation at the same time. Many thanks.

    • TomasV September 12, 2016 at 8:27 am - Reply

      I also agree . Having a segmentation of motivations (ideally a minimal one) is qualitatively interesting .
      What is quantitatively interesting is an analysis of the repartition of players among these categories .
      If it exists where can it be found ?
      And if it doesn’t exist , when will it be done ?

      • Nick Yee September 12, 2016 at 10:55 am

        We had two slides on this in our GDC 2016 talk, but we never blogged about it specifically. You can find the slides here: http://quanticfoundry.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Gamer-Motivation-Profile-GDC-2016-Slides.pdf. The relevant slides are titled “Primary Motivation” and “Split By Gender”. Note that these shift a great deal depending on the genre. This would definitely be a good topic to blog about. I had forgotten that we never surfaced this on the blog.

  18. Nikka Lao December 28, 2016 at 1:57 am - Reply

    Hi, I’m the type of person who takes random tests for fun (and getting to know myself better) so I love answering surveys that can help me learn more about myself. And I’m thankful for your studies as these are very helpful now to me as the information you have provided is very useful research material.

    I love reading psych books for fun and your research topic is fascinating.

    Keep up the good work.

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